The Latest

Jul 24, 2014

Can VH1 Classic hire me to tweet? Or at least produce a show.

Can VH1 Classic hire me to tweet? Or at least produce a show.

RT @robinhardwick: I shall now live tweet the 80s video block on @VH1Classic
VH1 Classic (@VH1Classic) July 24, 2014

As a kid ‘Like A Prayer’ bothered me mostly because Madonna’s bra straps kept showing #totally80s
Robin Hardwick (@robinhardwick) July 24, 2014

My favorite Van Halen singer was David Lee Roth’s crotch #jump #totally80s
Robin Hardwick (@robinhardwick) July 24, 2014

The Pet Shop…

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New recap of the world’s greatest show.

I nearly died when the mattress/dragon was marched through the building. New recap of Nathan For You…
Jul 24, 2014

New recap of the world’s greatest show.

I nearly died when the mattress/dragon was marched through the building. New recap of Nathan For You…

vicemag:

David Shapiro Isn’t Much Use to Anyone
David Shapiro and his Tumblr Pitchfork Reviews Reviews once felt “big on the internet.” Roughly five years ago, Shapiro—then fresh out of college with a shitty job and some self-esteem issues—started writing meta-reviews of the music reviews published on Pitchfork each morning.  As he commuted to a conservative clerical gig, he’d frantically type out ranting but sharp essays on his Blackberry memo pad (sans-capitalizations and with few paragraph breaks), deconstructing the music critics’ arguments and logic, and even commending certain reviews a “Best New Review” tag—a play on Pitchfork’s “Best New Music” symbol of indie gold status. From his office bathroom, he’d often write colloquial personal essays in the afternoon about his relationship with music, which are the only remaining fossils of his site today.
The website got very popular, earning Shapiro over 100,000 followers, writing gigs at The Wall Street Journal, Interview Magazine, and The New Yorker, as well as a profile of his Tumblr in The New York Times. Shortly after he stopped posting on Pitchfork Reviews Reviews, he wrote a screenplay and a novel, both which sold and made it out of production limbo. Despite the success, Shapiro has sworn off writing (save the occasional New Yorker piece), and has since finished most of law school and now works at a white-collar firm in Manhattan. 
His new book, You’re Not Much Use To Anyone, which comes out later this month, is a semi-autobiographical account of Shapiro’s life right out of college. It details the creation of Pitchfork Reviews Reviews and what was going on in his life at a time when he was especially insecure and looking for a form of authority and influence. 
The book’s main character, David, is both anxious and hyper-analytical—fanatical with trifling metrics of success like how many Internet followers he has, or ways his life doesn’t compare to the lives of Pitchfork writers he both idealizes and envies. So even though his Tumblr is just a Tumblr, he feels validated and important when people he was once infatuated with start paying attention to his thoughts and ideas. 
On a surface level, You’re Not Much Use To Anyone, sounds nominal: a physical book about a Tumblr about a music reviews website. But the story is a punchy and sometimes poignant read for any young person trying to figure out how he can become significant or simply noticeable to the people he/she admires. Over the course of a boozy, four-hour interview, we talked about his book being “almost desperate” to get you to finish it, feeling guilty about writing a semi-factual story about friends who didn’t sign up for being characters, and on his relationship with Pitchfork today.

VICE: The inspiration for your Tumblr and writing came from an unlikely source, but can you tell me about the actual inspiration for this book? David Shapiro: I was seeing this girl who was working on a novel and she wouldn’t tell me anything about it. I felt a little resentful that she wouldn’t share it. Later, she broke up with me. And I thought, what better way to get back at her then to write a book myself? It was months after I stopped posting on Pitchfork Reviews Reviews. I refilled my prescription for anti-anxiety medication prescription and wrote a draft in a week.
This must have been insane to pitch to a publisher. It’s a physical book about a meta-Tumblr. How would you describe it to someone with zero context?[Laughs] I still don’t even know how to describe it. I don’t know how to talk about it. I don’t have an elevator pitch. It’s a book about a blog about a popular music reviews website—after a certain point of shopping it around to publishers, I realized it was better to stay quiet during meetings and let my agent talk. 
To me, I mean, if you read the book, in many ways, Pitchfork is not the focus.Definitely. You could say Pitchfork is incidental. In another time, it would have been… I don’t know, like a car a magazine? It could have been written about any fountain of authority.
That’s what I found really interesting. In a lot of ways, your book details the rise of social media as a platform for anyone to assert their opinion and influence.Yeah, or throw rocks at the throne.
Read the whole interview
Jul 21, 2014 / 132 notes

vicemag:

David Shapiro Isn’t Much Use to Anyone

David Shapiro and his Tumblr Pitchfork Reviews Reviews once felt “big on the internet.” Roughly five years ago, Shapiro—then fresh out of college with a shitty job and some self-esteem issues—started writing meta-reviews of the music reviews published on Pitchfork each morning.  As he commuted to a conservative clerical gig, he’d frantically type out ranting but sharp essays on his Blackberry memo pad (sans-capitalizations and with few paragraph breaks), deconstructing the music critics’ arguments and logic, and even commending certain reviews a “Best New Review” tag—a play on Pitchfork’s “Best New Music” symbol of indie gold status. From his office bathroom, he’d often write colloquial personal essays in the afternoon about his relationship with music, which are the only remaining fossils of his site today.

The website got very popular, earning Shapiro over 100,000 followers, writing gigs at The Wall Street JournalInterview Magazine, and The New Yorkeras well as a profile of his Tumblr in The New York Times. Shortly after he stopped posting on Pitchfork Reviews Reviews, he wrote a screenplay and a novel, both which sold and made it out of production limbo. Despite the success, Shapiro has sworn off writing (save the occasional New Yorker piece), and has since finished most of law school and now works at a white-collar firm in Manhattan. 

His new book, You’re Not Much Use To Anyone, which comes out later this month, is a semi-autobiographical account of Shapiro’s life right out of college. It details the creation of Pitchfork Reviews Reviews and what was going on in his life at a time when he was especially insecure and looking for a form of authority and influence. 

The book’s main character, David, is both anxious and hyper-analytical—fanatical with trifling metrics of success like how many Internet followers he has, or ways his life doesn’t compare to the lives of Pitchfork writers he both idealizes and envies. So even though his Tumblr is just a Tumblr, he feels validated and important when people he was once infatuated with start paying attention to his thoughts and ideas. 

On a surface level, You’re Not Much Use To Anyone, sounds nominal: a physical book about a Tumblr about a music reviews website. But the story is a punchy and sometimes poignant read for any young person trying to figure out how he can become significant or simply noticeable to the people he/she admires. Over the course of a boozy, four-hour interview, we talked about his book being “almost desperate” to get you to finish it, feeling guilty about writing a semi-factual story about friends who didn’t sign up for being characters, and on his relationship with Pitchfork today.

VICE: The inspiration for your Tumblr and writing came from an unlikely source, but can you tell me about the actual inspiration for this book? 
David Shapiro: I was seeing this girl who was working on a novel and she wouldn’t tell me anything about it. I felt a little resentful that she wouldn’t share it. Later, she broke up with me. And I thought, what better way to get back at her then to write a book myself? It was months after I stopped posting on Pitchfork Reviews Reviews. I refilled my prescription for anti-anxiety medication prescription and wrote a draft in a week.

This must have been insane to pitch to a publisher. It’s a physical book about a meta-Tumblr. How would you describe it to someone with zero context?
[Laughs] I still don’t even know how to describe it. I don’t know how to talk about it. I don’t have an elevator pitch. It’s a book about a blog about a popular music reviews website—after a certain point of shopping it around to publishers, I realized it was better to stay quiet during meetings and let my agent talk. 

To me, I mean, if you read the book, in many ways, Pitchfork is not the focus.
Definitely. You could say Pitchfork is incidental. In another time, it would have been… I don’t know, like a car a magazine? It could have been written about any fountain of authority.

That’s what I found really interesting. In a lot of ways, your book details the rise of social media as a platform for anyone to assert their opinion and influence.
Yeah, or throw rocks at the throne.

Read the whole interview

MAKE OUT MAKE OUT MAKE OUT #themusketeers
Jul 20, 2014

MAKE OUT MAKE OUT MAKE OUT #themusketeers

Jul 20, 2014

Sketch Writing Meetings

[Me, bringing a draft of a sketch about, for example, a man walking his dog and runs into his ex-girlfriend.]

The feedback:

“Hmmm. I like it, but what if it was about a police officer, and instead of walking his dog, he’s fighting goblins. And instead of running into his ex-girlfriend, he goes to a carnival to get his palm read.”

Okay, thanks.

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I could never live without this album in my life.
Jul 20, 2014

I could never live without this album in my life.

mattmcguigan:


mattmcguigan:

how to make friends
Jul 20, 2014 / 96,759 notes

mattmcguigan:

mattmcguigan:

how to make friends

(via alibrariangoestoikea)

Jul 19, 2014

No one can ever be this kind of cool ever again.

No one can ever be this kind of cool ever again.

I wonder how many times a day they thought, “holy shit, I am fucking amazing.” Probably never, they hated themselves.

Joan Jett, Debbie Harry, David Johansen & Joey Ramone, 1977. http://t.co/zp1b07KveH
History In Pictures (@HistoryInPix) July 19, 2014

Patti Smith y Robert Mapplethorpe. http://t.co/VGCHLVZaAN
antonio serrano (@tonilonestar) July 09, 2014

I just finished reading Patti Smith’s Jus…

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UM HELLO
(via Check Out These Vintage Photos of New York City’s 1970s Punk Playground | Mother Jones)
Jul 19, 2014 / 5 notes
Proud of my building for writing assertive notes.
Jul 19, 2014 / 1 note

Proud of my building for writing assertive notes.

Jul 18, 2014 / 510 notes

(via continuants)

Jul 18, 2014 / 510 notes

(via continuants)

10 of the Strangest Finds on Netflix

I wrote about my favorite topic for KQED. There’s more where that came from.
Jul 18, 2014

10 of the Strangest Finds on Netflix

I wrote about my favorite topic for KQED. There’s more where that came from.

Jul 18, 2014
Jul 17, 2014